Monday, 5 April 2010

Don't Overtake on Eloff Street


Eloff Street 1968 (Pic by rustyproof via flicker)

Today another classic straight ahead instrumental jive LP, this time from the group the Black Eagles and issued in the early seventies on the Number One label.

The Black Eagles - Eloff Street (Number One 9006, c 1971)
01 Eloff Street.mp3
02 No U Turn.mp3
03 Hoog Tyd.mp3
04 Leagae Laka.mp3
05 Mamelodi Special.mp3
06 In Die Donker.mp3
07 Don't Overtake.mp3
08 Sesasedi.mp3
09 Time To Go.mp3
10 Closed Shop.mp3
11 8 by 8.mp3
12 Mandileni.mp3

RS LINK
MF LINK

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

thank you so much. sounds exciting this.
and the biggest thank you for the dark city sisters earlier...that made my heart survive this cold winter.
take care / K

Prof Babacar said...

Thank You so much.
I've been looking for Don't Overtake since 1977.
When it was played on a radio serie about SA Music.
It blew my mind @ the time and my band did cover it.
I didn't know who played it or the title, and I'm not sure that it was the Black Eagles version that I loved so much.
Do you know if there is other versions of this track?

Viagra Online said...

thanks for the recommendation about this music, my old brother know very well the list and the songs.

aperson said...

This album is very similar in style to "Sea Water" by Alfred Ndima, which you posted at http://electricjive.blogspot.com/2010/10/sea-water-minimal-mbaqanga-1972.html. And both are listed (in the mp3 track info at least) as being from 1972! Both are purely instrumental stripped-down mbaqanga -- almost like master classes in how to play South African music.

For some reason I can't quite pin down, I just love these "just the basics" tracks without any vocals. It perhaps feels like quintessential authentic mbaqanga, the "real stuff" without any frills or distractions. Very very nice! Thank you.

Strange observation: Both instrumental 1972 albums "Eloff Street" and "Sea Water" feature some tracks with titles in Afrikaans -- e.g. "Hoog Tyd" and "Tafeldoek" -- but one rarely (if ever) sees Afrikaans song titles on any other mbaqanga records. I wonder what the explanation is for this unusual detail.